Service-Learning Student Showcase

Spring 2020 Amy Zeh Service-Learning Student Showcase

Friday, April 10, 2020

10:00 am – 2:00 pm | Pegasus Ballroom

Application Deadline: Wednesday, March 18, 2020 | Applications to open mid-February!

Schedule

8:30 AM
Students participating in the event set-up their project presentation in the Pegasus Ballroom

9:30 AM
All projects set-up; judging begins. Presenters are expected to be present for the entire time period. Exception: when a presenter(s) for a given project have a course conflict. Once your project has been judged, you will be able to view other projects and vote on the Peer Choice Award, which recognizes the students’ choice for best overall service-learning project.

10:00-1:00 PM
Event open to UCF students, faculty, staff and community partners

1:00 PM
Judging ends

1:15 PM
Awards Ceremony

2:00 PM
Ceremony ends

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Students within any major are eligible to recommend a course that embodies a service-learning component as deemed by Experiential Learning.  Students will have the opportunity to submit their project for two of the following awards.

Children and Families: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, demonstrates a focus on providing opportunities for children (or families with children) to have the supports necessary to thrive and grow.

Poverty and Homelessness: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation, and reflection, demonstrates an understanding of poverty in the community; and engages those impacted by poverty, especially the homeless, in a way that helps those struggling to meet their basic needs.

Aging and the Elderly: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, focuses on the challenges faced by elderly members of the community who rely on others for medical care, sustenance, and companionship.

Public Education: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, demonstrates a commitment to ensuring that all young people living in our community have access to an education that provides the knowledge, skills and understandings necessary to be successful adults. (Must include engagement with students in a public school or programming funded by a public entity).

Equity and Social Justice: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, best demonstrates a commitment to recognizing, addressing and eroding circumstances that infringe on a person’s constitutional or human rights, based on the color of their skin, where they or their ancestors live/lived, where they do or do not worship, whether or not they view themselves as male and/or female, who they love/marry/consider family, or because they have been born with or developed a disability, whether visible or not, that requires an accommodation. (Note: Explicit beliefs may imply political perspectives; but working to create equitable structures in our society is a humanitarian endeavor, not a political one. We encourage presenters not to marginalize their work as humanitarians by instead focusing on their allegiance to a political ideology.)

Sustainability and the Environment: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, best demonstrates an effort to protect our planet for future generations; as well as for the many species of plants and animals we share Earth with (Note: Projects that seek to educate our community that choices we make today have measurable and tangible consequences for what happens to our world tomorrow; as well as projects that demonstrate or model research-based, Earth-friendly decision-making, are equally eligible for this award).

Health and Wellness: given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, demonstrates an understanding that practitioners provide care and support commensurate with their education and credentialing; and best demonstrates a commitment to help those who are suffering from illness or disease, and/or that educates members of the community on choices that are proven to contribute to better overall health.

Ethics and Social Responsibility: Given to the project that, through its design, implementation and reflection, that best demonstrates a commitment to making a positive impact on the community; where the aspirations of many are privileged over the ambitions of a few. In the current social climate, we must recognize that there is no clear pathway one can follow to be an “influencer.” Influencers are typically anointed overnight under rather random circumstances; which are likely to be inauthentic, and thus lead to a quick erosion in the “influencers” reach. A project winning this award will demonstrate that, on the other hand, clear steps can be taken to be an influence; that influence can be used exclusively for the good of a community; and that sharing good work can allow the influence to remain for an extended period of time.

Special Populations: This award will be given to a project that is designed to provide structures of support to a group within the community that faces unique challenges. Projects that focus on individuals with specific mental or physical disabilities, veterans or first responders, those in prisons or foster homes, or any other group of people, large or small, who need a little help, are eligible to win this award. The award will recognize a project that was successful in supporting the target group to the extent that others are inspired to take on similar projects.

 

Questions? Please contact Experiential Learning via email.

 oel@ucf.edu